Helping the Homeless Children on Bangkok’s Sukhumvit

Rebecca and I spent a few nights in Bangkok at the end of the trip. But instead of taking in the sights and reveling in its legendary┬ánightlife, we met up with a friend and spent an hour feeding the homeless on Bangkok’s popular Sukhumvit Road. The experience was eye-opening and better explained to me the intersection of human trafficking, organized crime and homelessness in Southeast Asia. Continue reading

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Mini-Post: Visit the Unrest-aurant!

thaiWe have a few days in Bangkok before we begin the long journey back to the US. Unfortunately, this is a weird time to be here. Every time we have tried to visit Thailand on this trip, there has been civil unrest. This time, the city is under martial law, as the military successfully executed a coup d’etat two weeks back.┬áNothing seems to be happening on the ground, but we thought it might be wise to speak with our hostel owner about the situation in case there was something we needed to know. Her response:

“This happens all the time here. There have been like 20 coups that I can remember. It’s too bad the military has stopped the protests; I usually send guests there to get free street food!”

So next time you’re in Bangkok during some kind of uprising, don’t be afraid. Just look for the best snack cart you can find and chow down!

Watching Sports with Your Ears

LA Kings

Courtesy of the LA Kings

I am a sports fan. This should come as no surprise to those of you who have been following this blog, since about three and a half months ago I expounded on the full extent of my sports obsession while lamenting my inability to watch the Olympics. Well, that sad time ended, and for awhile I forgot that sports existed at home. Then the Stanley Cup Finals came, and my wife’s team began its dramatic quest to win the cup. We still couldn’t watch, so we did the next best thing, the only thing we could do: we listened.
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Pemuteran Daily News

14361757846_27cfbf9926_qWe have been in Pemuteran, the small town on the northwest coast of Bali, for about two weeks now, patiently waiting on the beach for our visa extension to finish up. It’s such a small place that we have been to nearly every restaurant in town, some more than once, and are becoming familiar faces in the area. In an otherwise sleepy town (bedtime is about 9pm), a lot happened today, but there’s no local daily newspaper! So for a change of pace, I’m going to indulge my inner journalist and report the real-ish news here on my blog. Continue reading

Beautiful Bali

BaliIt’s the last month of our nearly six-month trip, and we’re ready to come home. Travel has worn us out. And even though we couldn’t wait to get to Indonesia and were excited to see as much of it as we could, it’s just too large of a country to do justice in month. So we had a choice: spend the rest of our time island-hopping or stick to one island. We chose the latter, and decided to spend our time on Bali. And now that our brains have finally entered vacation-relaxation mode, I can say confidently that we made the right choice. Continue reading

Yogyakarta and the Ramayana Ballet

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It has been awhile since I have been to the ballet. I think the last time was the San Francisco Ballet’s version of the Nutcracker, a lovely production Rebecca and I attended in an effort to relive her childhood Christmas tradition. I cannot say that I am usually a huge fan of the ballet; I’m not a dancer, so I usually just end up falling asleep to the music. But yesterday, in Yogyakarta on the island of Java, the Ramayana ballet we attended exceeded my expectations and rounded out nicely our mixed visit to Yogyakarta.
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“Hello, Mr., Can We Practice Our English With You?”

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Traveling as an English speaker is a luxury. English is essentially the universal language today, which means that wherever we go, someone speaks our language, with varying degrees of competency. Being able to speak English in the countries we have visited is a highly prized skill, one that everyone we have encountered in Southeast Asia has been eager to hone with us. But the strangest incident of English learning we have seen has been here in Indonesia, where for the past week, we have been physically stopped by kids looking to “practice English” at tourist sites.
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